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Thomas Paine

To argue with a person who has renounced the use of reason is like administering medicine to the dead.

Monday, June 18, 2012

18 June - iGoogle

NEAR ALTAMIRA, BRAZIL - JUNE 15: Construction ...NEAR ALTAMIRA, BRAZIL - JUNE 15: Construction continues at the Belo Monte dam complex in the Amazon basin on June 15, 2012 near Altamira, Brazil. Belo Monte will be the world’s third-largest hydroelectric project and will displace up to 20,000 people while diverting the Xingu River and flooding as much as 230 square miles of rainforest. The controversial project is one of around 60 hydroelectric projects Brazil has planned in the Amazon to generate electricity for its rapidly expanding economy. While environmentalists and indigenous groups oppose the dam, many Brazilians support the project. The Brazilian Amazon, home to 60 percent of the world’s largest forest and 20 percent of the Earth’s oxygen, remains threatened by the rapid development of the country. The area is currently populated by over 20 million people and is challenged by deforestation, agriculture, mining, a governmental dam building spree, illegal land speculation including the occupation of forest reserves and indigenous land and other issues. Over 100 heads of state and tens of thousands of participants and protesters will descend on Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, later this month for the Rio+20 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development or ‘Earth Summit’. Host Brazil is caught up in its own dilemma between accelerated growth and environmental preservation. (Image credit: Getty Images via @daylife)BELEM, BRAZIL - JUNE 07:  Workers (R) offload ...BELEM, BRAZIL - JUNE 07: Workers (R) offload baskets of acai berry before sunrise at the historic Ver-el-Peso market on June 7, 2012 in Belem, Brazil. Belem is considered the entrance gate to the Amazon and for more than 300 years, boats have unloaded their wares from deep in the Amazon at the historic market. Fishermen and others who make their livelihood on the waters of the Amazon basin face a variety of environmental hazards including pollution from mining, agricultural runoff and silting of the waters caused by deforestation.'Ver-el-Peso' means 'see the weight' and was named after the colonial Portuguese mandatory weighing of merchandise to be taxed for the Portuguese crown. The Brazilian Amazon, home to 60 percent of the world’s largest forest and 20 percent of the Earth’s oxygen, remains threatened by the rapid development of the country. The area is currently populated by over 20 million people and is challenged by deforestation, agriculture, mining, a governmental dam building spree, illegal land speculation including the occupation of forest reserves and indigenous land and other issues. Over 100 heads of state and tens of thousands of participants and protesters will descend on Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, later this month for the Rio+20 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development or 'Earth Summit'. Host Brazil is caught up in its own dilemma between accelerated growth and environmental preservation. The summit aims to overcome years of deadlock over environmental concerns and marks the 20th anniversary of the landmark Earth Summit in Rio in 1992, which delivered the Climate Convention and a host of other promises. Brazil is now the world’s sixth largest economy and is set to host the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Summer Olympics. (Image credit: Getty Images via @daylife)English: National Science Board Sustainable En...English: National Science Board Sustainable Energy Report Front Page (Photo credit: Wikipedia)NEAR ALTAMIRA, BRAZIL - JUNE 14: (EDITORS NOTE...NEAR ALTAMIRA, BRAZIL - JUNE 14: (EDITORS NOTE: A polarizing filter was used in creating this picture) An old boat is submerged in the Xingu River near the site where the Belo Monte dam complex is under construction in the Amazon basin on June 14, 2012 near Altamira, Brazil. Belo Monte will be the world’s third-largest hydroelectric project and will displace up to 20,000 people while diverting the Xingu River and flooding as much as 230 square miles of rainforest. The controversial $16 billion project is one of around 60 hydroelectric projects Brazil has planned in the Amazon to generate electricity for its rapidly expanding economy. The Brazilian Amazon, home to 60 percent of the world’s largest forest and 20 percent of the Earth’s oxygen, remains threatened by the rapid development of the country. The area is currently populated by over 20 million people and is challenged by deforestation, agriculture, mining, a governmental dam building spree, illegal land speculation including the occupation of forest reserves and indigenous land and other issues. Over 100 heads of state and tens of thousands of participants and protesters will descend on Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, later this month for the Rio+20 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development or ‘Earth Summit’. Host Brazil is caught up in its own dilemma between accelerated growth and environmental preservation. The summit aims to overcome years of deadlock over environmental concerns and marks the 20th anniversary of the landmark Earth Summit in Rio in 1992, which delivered the Climate Convention and a host of other promises. Brazil is now the world’s sixth largest economy and is set to host the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Summer Olympics. (Image credit: Getty Images via @daylife)ALTAMIRA, BRAZIL - JUNE 16:  A man drives his ...ALTAMIRA, BRAZIL - JUNE 16: A man drives his motorcycle through a low-lying area near the area where the Belo Monte dam complex is under construction in the Amazon basin on June 16, 2012 in Altamira, Brazil. Belo Monte will be the world’s third-largest hydroelectric project and will displace up to 20,000 people while diverting the Xingu River and flooding as much as 230 square miles of rainforest. The government says residents forced to relocate due to the dam will be compensated and that most will benefit from relocation. Opponents of the dam are skeptical of this claim. The controversial project is one of around 60 hydroelectric projects Brazil has planned in the Amazon to generate electricity for its rapidly expanding economy. While environmentalists and indigenous groups oppose the dam, many Brazilians support the project. The Brazilian Amazon, home to 60 percent of the world’s largest forest and 20 percent of the Earth’s oxygen, remains threatened by the rapid development of the country. The area is currently populated by over 20 million people and is challenged by deforestation, agriculture, mining, a governmental dam building spree, illegal land speculation including the occupation of forest reserves and indigenous land and other issues. Over 100 heads of state and tens of thousands of participants and protesters will descend on Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, later this month for the Rio+20 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development or ‘Earth Summit’. Host Brazil is caught up in its own dilemma between accelerated growth and environmental preservation. (Image credit: Getty Images via @daylife)PARA STATE, BRAZIL - JUNE 08: A deforested sec...PARA STATE, BRAZIL - JUNE 08: A deforested section of Amazon rainforest is seen in the mist from an airplane at dawn on June 8, 2012 in Para state, Brazil. Although deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon is down 80 percent since 2004, environmentalists fear recent changes to the Forest Code will lead to further destruction. Around 20 percent of the rainforest has already been destroyed. The Brazilian Amazon, home to 60 percent of the world’s largest forest and 20 percent of the Earth’s oxygen, remains threatened by the rapid development of the country. The area is currently populated by over 20 million people and is challenged by deforestation, agriculture, mining, a governmental dam building spree, illegal land speculation including the occupation of forest reserves and indigenous land and other issues. Over 100 heads of state and tens of thousands of participants and protesters will descend on Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, later this month for the Rio+20 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development or 'Earth Summit'. Host Brazil is caught up in its own dilemma between accelerated growth and environmental preservation. The summit aims to overcome years of deadlock over environmental concerns and marks the 20th anniversary of the landmark Earth Summit in Rio in 1992, which delivered the Climate Convention and a host of other promises. Brazil is now the world’s sixth largest economy and is set to host the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Summer Olympics. (Image credit: Getty Images via @daylife)BELEM, BRAZIL - JUNE 07: A worker prepares Ama...BELEM, BRAZIL - JUNE 07: A worker prepares Amazonian flowers and plants at the historic Ver-el-Peso market on June 7, 2012 in Belem, Brazil. Belem is considered the entrance gate to the Amazon and for more than 300 years, boats have unloaded their wares from deep in the Amazon at the market. Fishermen and others who make their livelihood on the waters of the Amazon basin face a variety of environmental hazards including pollution from mining, agricultural runoff and silting of the waters caused by deforestation.'Ver-el-Peso' means 'see the weight' and was named after the colonial Portuguese mandatory weighing of merchandise to be taxed for the Portuguese crown. The Brazilian Amazon, home to 60 percent of the world’s largest forest and 20 percent of the Earth’s oxygen, remains threatened by the rapid development of the country. The area is currently populated by over 20 million people and is challenged by deforestation, agriculture, mining, a governmental dam building spree, illegal land speculation including the occupation of forest reserves and indigenous land and other issues. Over 100 heads of state and tens of thousands of participants and protesters will descend on Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, later this month for the Rio+20 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development or 'Earth Summit'. Host Brazil is caught up in its own dilemma between accelerated growth and environmental preservation. The summit aims to overcome years of deadlock over environmental concerns and marks the 20th anniversary of the landmark Earth Summit in Rio in 1992, which delivered the Climate Convention and a host of other promises. Brazil is now the world’s sixth largest economy and is set to host the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Summer Olympics. (Image credit: Getty Images via @daylife)PARA STATE, BRAZIL - JUNE 09:  Drivers pass th...PARA STATE, BRAZIL - JUNE 09: Drivers pass through deforested land along federal highway BR-222 on June 9, 2012 in Para state, Brazil. Highway construction through Amazonian rainforest has led to accelerated rates of deforestation. Although deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon is down 80 percent since 2004, environmentalists fear recent changes to the Forest Code will lead to further destruction. Around 20 percent of the rainforest has already been destroyed. The Brazilian Amazon, home to 60 percent of the world’s largest forest and 20 percent of the Earth’s oxygen, remains threatened by the rapid development of the country. The area is currently populated by over 20 million people and is challenged by deforestation, agriculture, mining, a governmental dam building spree, illegal land speculation including the occupation of forest reserves and indigenous land and other issues. Over 100 heads of state and tens of thousands of participants and protesters will descend on Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, later this month for the Rio+20 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development or 'Earth Summit'. Host Brazil is caught up in its own dilemma between accelerated growth and environmental preservation. The summit aims to overcome years of deadlock over environmental concerns and marks the 20th anniversary of the landmark Earth Summit in Rio in 1992, which delivered the Climate Convention and a host of other promises. Brazil is now the world’s sixth largest economy and is set to host the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Summer Olympics. (Image credit: Getty Images via @daylife)NEAR ARARIBOIA INDIGENOUS RESERVE, BRAZIL - JU...NEAR ARARIBOIA INDIGENOUS RESERVE, BRAZIL - JUNE 10: A truck transporting illegally harvested Amazon rainforest logs is broken down on a road near protected indigenous land on June 10, 2012 near the Arariboia Indigenous Reserve, Maranhao state, Brazil. Guajajara tribe members on the reserve say their forests are being plundered by illegal loggers who killed a member of their tribe who attempted to resist. According to the National Institute for Space Research (INPE), which tracks rainforest destruction by satellite, 242 square kilometers in the reserve have already been destroyed. From 1987-2011, 1.1 million hectares of wood disappeared in protected indigenous reserves, according to the Brazilian government. The Brazilian Amazon, home to 60 percent of the world’s largest forest and 20 percent of the Earth’s oxygen, remains threatened by the rapid development of the country. The area is currently populated by over 20 million people and is challenged by deforestation, agriculture, mining, a governmental dam building spree, illegal land speculation including the occupation of forest reserves and indigenous land and other issues. Over 100 heads of state and tens of thousands of participants and protesters will descend on Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, later this month for the Rio+20 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development or 'Earth Summit'. Host Brazil is caught up in its own dilemma between accelerated growth and environmental preservation. The summit aims to overcome years of deadlock over environmental concerns and marks the 20th anniversary of the landmark Earth Summit in Rio in 1992, which delivered the Climate Convention and a host of other promises. Brazil is now the world’s sixth largest economy and is set to host the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Summer Olympics. (Image credit: Getty Images via @daylife)RONDON DO PARA, BRAZIL - JUNE 08: A worker car...RONDON DO PARA, BRAZIL - JUNE 08: A worker carries a bag of charcoal produced from illegally harvested Amazon rainforest wood up a ladder onto a truck on June 8, 2012 in Rondon do Para, Brazil. According to a recent Greenpeace study, illegal wood charcoal is primarily used in Brazil to power smelters producing pig iron, which is used to make steel for industries including U.S. auto manufacturing. Illegal charcoal camps were found to sometimes result in slave labor and the destruction of rainforest on protected indigenous lands. Between 2003-2011, 2,700 charcoal camp workers were liberated from conditions akin to slavery, according to Greenpeace. The workers in this photo said they were paid $40 per truckload of charcoal. The Brazilian Amazon, home to 60 percent of the world’s largest forest and 20 percent of the Earth’s oxygen, remains threatened by the rapid development of the country. The area is currently populated by over 20 million people and is challenged by deforestation, agriculture, mining, a governmental dam building spree, illegal land speculation including the occupation of forest reserves and indigenous land and other issues. Over 100 heads of state and tens of thousands of participants and protesters will descend on Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, later this month for the Rio+20 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development or 'Earth Summit'. Host Brazil is caught up in its own dilemma between accelerated growth and environmental preservation. The summit aims to overcome years of deadlock over environmental concerns and marks the 20th anniversary of the landmark Earth Summit in Rio in 1992, which delivered the Climate Convention and a host of other promises. Brazil is now the world’s sixth largest economy and is set to host the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Summer Olympics. (Image credit: Getty Images via @daylife)ALTAMIRA, BRAZIL - JUNE 14:  Students practice...ALTAMIRA, BRAZIL - JUNE 14: Students practice music near the site where the Belo Monte dam complex is under construction in the Amazon basin on June 14, 2012 in Altamira, Brazil. Belo Monte will be the world’s third-largest hydroelectric project and will displace up to 20,000 people while diverting the Xingu River and flooding as much as 230 square miles of rainforest. Thousands of Altamira residents will need to be relocated as up to one-third of the city will be underwater once the project is completed. The controversial $16 billion project is one of around 60 hydroelectric projects Brazil has planned in the Amazon to generate electricity for its rapidly expanding economy. The Brazilian Amazon, home to 60 percent of the world’s largest forest and 20 percent of the Earth’s oxygen, remains threatened by the rapid development of the country. The area is currently populated by over 20 million people and is challenged by deforestation, agriculture, mining, a governmental dam building spree, illegal land speculation including the occupation of forest reserves and indigenous land and other issues. Over 100 heads of state and tens of thousands of participants and protesters will descend on Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, later this month for the Rio+20 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development or ‘Earth Summit’. Host Brazil is caught up in its own dilemma between accelerated growth and environmental preservation. (Image credit: Getty Images via @daylife)A Helicopter Brings a Fresh Work Shift to the ...A Helicopter Brings a Fresh Work Shift to the Site of Clean - Up Operations Following a Massive Oil Spill Into the San Juan River Crews Worked Round the Clock at This Log Boom in Monument Valley Utah, 10/1972 (Photo credit: The U.S. National Archives)Let our Forests grow and our Rivers flow.Let our Forests grow and our Rivers flow. (Photo credit: Preserved Light by Caillum Smith)North America and Pelican Nebulae (narrowband)North America and Pelican Nebulae (narrowband) (Photo credit: DJMcCrady)Australia pinnacleAustralia pinnacle (Photo credit: Kenny Teo (zoompict))Australia PerthAustralia Perth (Photo credit: Kenny Teo (zoompict))Spiders and two Shield BugsSpiders and two Shield Bugs (Photo credit: wallygrom)Measuring soil carbonMeasuring soil carbon (Photo credit: glbrc.communications)Sexual Behavior in the HUMAN MALE (1948) ........Sexual Behavior in the HUMAN MALE (1948) .....item 2..ANSWERS -- SAT TEST CHEATING (October 27, 2011) .....item 3..Atomic Dog [Original Extended Version] - George Clinton (1982) ... (Photo credit: marsmet523)1988 Pontiac Fiero GT1988 Pontiac Fiero GT (Photo credit: Wikipedia)English: 1984 Pontiac Fiero. Aftermarket rims.English: 1984 Pontiac Fiero. Aftermarket rims. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

BBC
Greeks in race to form coalition
The leader of Greece's election-winning party begins talks to form a national coalition, as markets falter and European bank stocks plummet.  
Croatia 0-1 Spain

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Blog of Rights - ACLU
We're Ready to Defend Washington's Marriage Law at the Ballot Box

CNET
The 404 1,076: Where you don't know you're beautiful (podcast)

CNN
Obama and Putin discuss Syria
President Barack Obama said Monday that he and Russian President Vladimir Putin discussed the conflict in Syria and "agreed that we need to see a... 
Glenn Beck drops his name from Web network, promises media 'revolution'

Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
Green investments will boost economy and set us on path to climate justice

Carbon Farmers of Australia
Could you be on the Positive List?

Center for Climate and Energy Solutions


Circle of Blue - water news
Federal Water Tap, June 18: EPA Framework for Stormwater and Sewers

Commentators
Dominic Lawson: Greed is the reason your doctor won't see you on Thursday

Common Dreams
A Store (and Eventually Country) For All Americans

Daily Bell
Mark Skousen on FreedomFest 2012: Finding Freedom in an Unfree World

Daily News Egypt
Pan-Muslim body may participate in UN Syria observer mission

Democracy Now!
Rep. Luis GutiƩrrez: In Obama Deportation Move, Long-Term Immigration Activism "Has Been Rewarded"

Sorry Global Warming Alarmists, The Earth Is Cooling - Forbes

Discovery
Baby Robot Learns First Words
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EPA Water science news
2012 Beach Grants

EPA Radiation News

Food and Water Watch
Corporations, Universities and You

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Medical imaging ups breast cancer risk
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Aspirin's Mostly Unrecognized Connection to Serious Medical Problems

Force Change
Ask Rwanda to Allow Safe Abortions

FreakOut Nation
Mitt claims President Obama lacks experience, notes Obama’s political history as a “governor”

Guardian UK
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LobeLog
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memeorandum
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NPR
Obama Nominee As Ambassador To Iraq Withdraws

NRC
II-12-043: NRC Schedules Meeting June 28 in Atlanta to Discuss Proposed International Isotopes Facility in New Mexico

New Scientist
Second strain of cholera found in Haiti

news 24

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PECAN Group
More Killed* in Chicago this Year than Afghanistan
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6 Powers Urge Iran to 'Engage Seriously' in Moscow Nuclear Talks
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Driftcatching with Iowa farmers

Philippines News
One killed as light plane crashes in southern Philippines

Political MoJo - Mother Jones
Chart: Why Liberals Lose Primaries More Often Than Conservatives

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Psychology Today
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Scientific American
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TED
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Louis Vuitton Loses Bogus Trademark Lawsuit: Using Fake Handbag In Hangover II Isn't Infringement

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USA Today
Report: Russia to send marines to Syria

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After Bariatric Surgery, Alcohol Abuse More Likely
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Daily Galaxy
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TO DO

Reuters
TOKYO (Reuters) - Japan approved on Monday incentives for renewable energy that could unleash billions of dollars in clean-energy investment and help the ...
MarketWatch (press release)
OTTAWA, ONTARIO, Jun 18, 2012 (MARKETWIRE via COMTEX) -- BrookfieldRenewable Energy Group announced today that $350000 has been distributed ...
Arizona Daily Sun
BALTIMORE _ The case that has rattled the nation's renewable fuels industry began with some flashy cars.
Washington Post
Utilities deregulation makes shopping for electricity strange: Can you really buy green energy?
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HUMAN HABITAT

San Jose Mercury News
Gregoire noted that the Department ofEcology has been approved to use $100000 from its litter cleanup account for tsunami debris removal. However, a "steady ...
Hindustan Times
The government is considering setting up of committee to examine the ecological impact of developing projects in Himalayas including on national river Ganga ...
Joystiq
Indie sandbox MMO Embers of Caerus wrapped up its kickstarter feature week with a pair of developer videos covering player stats and something called ...
University of British Columbia
Developed by Rees and Wackernagel in the early 1990s, the ecological footprint builds on Rees' earlier research on the Earth's carrying capacity. It is an ...
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WATER POWER

Herald Sun
EXCLUSIVE: MELBOURNE householders have won a major discount on their waterbills in a dramatic backflip by the Baillieu Government over a desalination ...
Fox News
Tens of thousands of refugees fleeing war in Sudan are struggling to find enough water to drink and cook with, leading to the deaths of an unknown number from ...
MarketWatch (press release)
"Since water is the asset American Water is the steward of and water quality is of utmost importance, it is imperative for us to stay current and have technology ...
New York Daily News
New Delhi, June 18 — Delhi Chief Minister Sheila Dikshit met her Haryana counterpart B.S Hooda Monday in an effort to resolve the ongoing water crisis in the ...
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